Citrix XenDesktop Windows 8 and Server 2012 Optimization with AppSense Environment Manager

Citrix XenDesktop Windows 8 and Server 2012 Optimization with AppSense Environment Manager

Citrix XenDesktop Windows 8 and Server 2012 Optimization with AppSense Environment Manager

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The reason for this article is to (hopefully) save those of you who use AppSense Environment Manager some time and effort when optimizing your Server 2012 R2 workloads your deploying with XenDesktop or XenApp.

Citrix have done a great job in providing an optimization guide for Windows 8 and Server 2012 that can be found here:

https://www.citrix.com/blogs/2014/02/06/windows-8-and-server-2012-optimization-guide/

They have also done a great job of wrapping this all up in a nice script for you to run on your “gold” image so that before deploying it you have a nice optimized image for your workload delivery.  If that is how you want to manage your images then no need to read on, however, if (like me) you want to completely automate your gold image build then you would want to put all of these settings into AppSense Environment Manager for easy / repeatable deployment.

In this article I will run you through importing all the settings in the official Citrix Optimization guide into your AppSense Environment Manager Deployment, furthermore, I will provide you with the XML files to import and save you hours of work putting them all in yourself.

A couple of pre-reqs to doing this.

  • These files come as is – please test in development before putting them into a production environment
  • This article assumes you know about policy creation within AppSemse EM and have a working environment to test in
  • BITS is not disabled as AppSense Requires this
  • Optimize Processor Resource Scheduling is disabled in this case as I run AppSense Performance Manager for that

Step 1 – Download the XML Templates

Click HERE for the Computer Settings

Click HERE for the User Settings

Unzip these 2 files and save the XML files to a location that can be reached from the AppSense Environment Manager Console

Step 2 – Import the Settings into the Policy

In this example I am going to start with a blank policy but you may want to pull these settings into your existing policy

Right Click on the Computer Start-up node and select Policy Templates – Import

01 - import template

Locate the Computer Settings XML file you downloaded earlier

02 - locate computer settings xml

Click on OK and you will see the settings imported for you

03 - settings imported

NOTE: I have disabled Processor Optimization – you can re-enable it if you don’t use AppSense Performance Manager

04 - optimize processor

Right click on the Pre-Desktop User Node and select Policy Templates – Import

05 - import user settings

Click ok and you will see the settings imported for the user

06 - policy imported

Rename “Machine” to “User” (You don’t strictly need to do this but it looks nicer on the config)

07 - rename to user

That’s it – save and deploy the config to your Windows 8 or 2012 R2 workload servers.

Hopefully this will save you some time entering all the configuration into your AppSense Environment Manager console.

Laters,

b@m

Service Settings

08 - service settings

Computer Registry Settings

09 - computer registry settings

User Registry Settings

10 - user registry settings

5 thoughts on “Citrix XenDesktop Windows 8 and Server 2012 Optimization with AppSense Environment Manager

    1. Bretty Post author

      Thanks Dan,

      Will hopefully save you some time, worked ok in my lab but had to tweak the processor scheduling and the BITS to get PM and EM to work correctly.

      Dave.

  1. Ruslan

    Many thanks for sharing Dave, I can’t wait to compare with mine :) BITS is required to download agent itself, if I remember correctly.

    1. Bretty Post author

      Yep, that’s right, with BITS disabled the agent won’t install and configure correctly.
      Should be a pretty standard config, just the Citrix 2012 Optimization guide without the BITS and processor scheduling.
      Oh, and the .Net 3.5 Install.

      Dave.

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